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International Year of Family Farming: Training for Young Farmers Is Invaluable

International Year of Family Farming: Training for Young Farmers Is Invaluable



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Training programs like NFU’s Beginning Farmer Institute are invaluable educational resources that seek to provide support for the next generation of farmers. U.S. House Congressman Tim Walz said, “[W]ith the average age of the U.S. farmer at 57, ensuring that the next generation of American farmers is able to provide the world with a safe, abundant supply of food should be a top priority. To accomplish this goal, we must provide our youth with the training and tools they need to seize opportunity and take up farms of their own.”


How to make farming an appealing career choice for a new generation

With the challenges of climate change and food and water security, there's never been a greater need for innovative, sustainable farming in the UK. But the industry is facing a severe shortage of new recruits. With the average age of a farmer at 58, the Royal Agricultural Society of England (RASE) report estimates the UK will need 60,000 new entrants over the next decade.

One of the biggest obstacles for aspiring farmers is the cost – especially the increasing price of farmland – and most opportunities arise through succession or inheritance. Startup costs are also high.

But there are encouraging signs. Demand for agricultural courses is increasing, reports Harper Adams University College, which has experienced an 11% increase over the last five years, while the Royal Agricultural College has seen demand increase by 8% this year. Russell Readman, agriculture course manager at Harper Adams, explains that the industry is in a more buoyant mood the key driver being the need to increase sustainable food production.

Graduates from agricultural courses enjoy exceptionally high employment rates, with Harper Adams in the top three in the country. Readman attributes this success to the year in industry all students undertake during their course, giving them exposure to the workplace and helping them gain key skills – both technical and interpersonal. Employer feedback is that these students have a can-do attitude, while "the applied nature of the courses demonstrates principles in practice".

The diversity of opportunities in farming also contributes to the high employment rates, according to Readman, with the sector offering roles in both food production and ancillary services. It's also a global industry and many students find their transferable skills are useful abroad.

So how can the farming sector attract potential recruits?


How to make farming an appealing career choice for a new generation

With the challenges of climate change and food and water security, there's never been a greater need for innovative, sustainable farming in the UK. But the industry is facing a severe shortage of new recruits. With the average age of a farmer at 58, the Royal Agricultural Society of England (RASE) report estimates the UK will need 60,000 new entrants over the next decade.

One of the biggest obstacles for aspiring farmers is the cost – especially the increasing price of farmland – and most opportunities arise through succession or inheritance. Startup costs are also high.

But there are encouraging signs. Demand for agricultural courses is increasing, reports Harper Adams University College, which has experienced an 11% increase over the last five years, while the Royal Agricultural College has seen demand increase by 8% this year. Russell Readman, agriculture course manager at Harper Adams, explains that the industry is in a more buoyant mood the key driver being the need to increase sustainable food production.

Graduates from agricultural courses enjoy exceptionally high employment rates, with Harper Adams in the top three in the country. Readman attributes this success to the year in industry all students undertake during their course, giving them exposure to the workplace and helping them gain key skills – both technical and interpersonal. Employer feedback is that these students have a can-do attitude, while "the applied nature of the courses demonstrates principles in practice".

The diversity of opportunities in farming also contributes to the high employment rates, according to Readman, with the sector offering roles in both food production and ancillary services. It's also a global industry and many students find their transferable skills are useful abroad.

So how can the farming sector attract potential recruits?


How to make farming an appealing career choice for a new generation

With the challenges of climate change and food and water security, there's never been a greater need for innovative, sustainable farming in the UK. But the industry is facing a severe shortage of new recruits. With the average age of a farmer at 58, the Royal Agricultural Society of England (RASE) report estimates the UK will need 60,000 new entrants over the next decade.

One of the biggest obstacles for aspiring farmers is the cost – especially the increasing price of farmland – and most opportunities arise through succession or inheritance. Startup costs are also high.

But there are encouraging signs. Demand for agricultural courses is increasing, reports Harper Adams University College, which has experienced an 11% increase over the last five years, while the Royal Agricultural College has seen demand increase by 8% this year. Russell Readman, agriculture course manager at Harper Adams, explains that the industry is in a more buoyant mood the key driver being the need to increase sustainable food production.

Graduates from agricultural courses enjoy exceptionally high employment rates, with Harper Adams in the top three in the country. Readman attributes this success to the year in industry all students undertake during their course, giving them exposure to the workplace and helping them gain key skills – both technical and interpersonal. Employer feedback is that these students have a can-do attitude, while "the applied nature of the courses demonstrates principles in practice".

The diversity of opportunities in farming also contributes to the high employment rates, according to Readman, with the sector offering roles in both food production and ancillary services. It's also a global industry and many students find their transferable skills are useful abroad.

So how can the farming sector attract potential recruits?


How to make farming an appealing career choice for a new generation

With the challenges of climate change and food and water security, there's never been a greater need for innovative, sustainable farming in the UK. But the industry is facing a severe shortage of new recruits. With the average age of a farmer at 58, the Royal Agricultural Society of England (RASE) report estimates the UK will need 60,000 new entrants over the next decade.

One of the biggest obstacles for aspiring farmers is the cost – especially the increasing price of farmland – and most opportunities arise through succession or inheritance. Startup costs are also high.

But there are encouraging signs. Demand for agricultural courses is increasing, reports Harper Adams University College, which has experienced an 11% increase over the last five years, while the Royal Agricultural College has seen demand increase by 8% this year. Russell Readman, agriculture course manager at Harper Adams, explains that the industry is in a more buoyant mood the key driver being the need to increase sustainable food production.

Graduates from agricultural courses enjoy exceptionally high employment rates, with Harper Adams in the top three in the country. Readman attributes this success to the year in industry all students undertake during their course, giving them exposure to the workplace and helping them gain key skills – both technical and interpersonal. Employer feedback is that these students have a can-do attitude, while "the applied nature of the courses demonstrates principles in practice".

The diversity of opportunities in farming also contributes to the high employment rates, according to Readman, with the sector offering roles in both food production and ancillary services. It's also a global industry and many students find their transferable skills are useful abroad.

So how can the farming sector attract potential recruits?


How to make farming an appealing career choice for a new generation

With the challenges of climate change and food and water security, there's never been a greater need for innovative, sustainable farming in the UK. But the industry is facing a severe shortage of new recruits. With the average age of a farmer at 58, the Royal Agricultural Society of England (RASE) report estimates the UK will need 60,000 new entrants over the next decade.

One of the biggest obstacles for aspiring farmers is the cost – especially the increasing price of farmland – and most opportunities arise through succession or inheritance. Startup costs are also high.

But there are encouraging signs. Demand for agricultural courses is increasing, reports Harper Adams University College, which has experienced an 11% increase over the last five years, while the Royal Agricultural College has seen demand increase by 8% this year. Russell Readman, agriculture course manager at Harper Adams, explains that the industry is in a more buoyant mood the key driver being the need to increase sustainable food production.

Graduates from agricultural courses enjoy exceptionally high employment rates, with Harper Adams in the top three in the country. Readman attributes this success to the year in industry all students undertake during their course, giving them exposure to the workplace and helping them gain key skills – both technical and interpersonal. Employer feedback is that these students have a can-do attitude, while "the applied nature of the courses demonstrates principles in practice".

The diversity of opportunities in farming also contributes to the high employment rates, according to Readman, with the sector offering roles in both food production and ancillary services. It's also a global industry and many students find their transferable skills are useful abroad.

So how can the farming sector attract potential recruits?


How to make farming an appealing career choice for a new generation

With the challenges of climate change and food and water security, there's never been a greater need for innovative, sustainable farming in the UK. But the industry is facing a severe shortage of new recruits. With the average age of a farmer at 58, the Royal Agricultural Society of England (RASE) report estimates the UK will need 60,000 new entrants over the next decade.

One of the biggest obstacles for aspiring farmers is the cost – especially the increasing price of farmland – and most opportunities arise through succession or inheritance. Startup costs are also high.

But there are encouraging signs. Demand for agricultural courses is increasing, reports Harper Adams University College, which has experienced an 11% increase over the last five years, while the Royal Agricultural College has seen demand increase by 8% this year. Russell Readman, agriculture course manager at Harper Adams, explains that the industry is in a more buoyant mood the key driver being the need to increase sustainable food production.

Graduates from agricultural courses enjoy exceptionally high employment rates, with Harper Adams in the top three in the country. Readman attributes this success to the year in industry all students undertake during their course, giving them exposure to the workplace and helping them gain key skills – both technical and interpersonal. Employer feedback is that these students have a can-do attitude, while "the applied nature of the courses demonstrates principles in practice".

The diversity of opportunities in farming also contributes to the high employment rates, according to Readman, with the sector offering roles in both food production and ancillary services. It's also a global industry and many students find their transferable skills are useful abroad.

So how can the farming sector attract potential recruits?


How to make farming an appealing career choice for a new generation

With the challenges of climate change and food and water security, there's never been a greater need for innovative, sustainable farming in the UK. But the industry is facing a severe shortage of new recruits. With the average age of a farmer at 58, the Royal Agricultural Society of England (RASE) report estimates the UK will need 60,000 new entrants over the next decade.

One of the biggest obstacles for aspiring farmers is the cost – especially the increasing price of farmland – and most opportunities arise through succession or inheritance. Startup costs are also high.

But there are encouraging signs. Demand for agricultural courses is increasing, reports Harper Adams University College, which has experienced an 11% increase over the last five years, while the Royal Agricultural College has seen demand increase by 8% this year. Russell Readman, agriculture course manager at Harper Adams, explains that the industry is in a more buoyant mood the key driver being the need to increase sustainable food production.

Graduates from agricultural courses enjoy exceptionally high employment rates, with Harper Adams in the top three in the country. Readman attributes this success to the year in industry all students undertake during their course, giving them exposure to the workplace and helping them gain key skills – both technical and interpersonal. Employer feedback is that these students have a can-do attitude, while "the applied nature of the courses demonstrates principles in practice".

The diversity of opportunities in farming also contributes to the high employment rates, according to Readman, with the sector offering roles in both food production and ancillary services. It's also a global industry and many students find their transferable skills are useful abroad.

So how can the farming sector attract potential recruits?


How to make farming an appealing career choice for a new generation

With the challenges of climate change and food and water security, there's never been a greater need for innovative, sustainable farming in the UK. But the industry is facing a severe shortage of new recruits. With the average age of a farmer at 58, the Royal Agricultural Society of England (RASE) report estimates the UK will need 60,000 new entrants over the next decade.

One of the biggest obstacles for aspiring farmers is the cost – especially the increasing price of farmland – and most opportunities arise through succession or inheritance. Startup costs are also high.

But there are encouraging signs. Demand for agricultural courses is increasing, reports Harper Adams University College, which has experienced an 11% increase over the last five years, while the Royal Agricultural College has seen demand increase by 8% this year. Russell Readman, agriculture course manager at Harper Adams, explains that the industry is in a more buoyant mood the key driver being the need to increase sustainable food production.

Graduates from agricultural courses enjoy exceptionally high employment rates, with Harper Adams in the top three in the country. Readman attributes this success to the year in industry all students undertake during their course, giving them exposure to the workplace and helping them gain key skills – both technical and interpersonal. Employer feedback is that these students have a can-do attitude, while "the applied nature of the courses demonstrates principles in practice".

The diversity of opportunities in farming also contributes to the high employment rates, according to Readman, with the sector offering roles in both food production and ancillary services. It's also a global industry and many students find their transferable skills are useful abroad.

So how can the farming sector attract potential recruits?


How to make farming an appealing career choice for a new generation

With the challenges of climate change and food and water security, there's never been a greater need for innovative, sustainable farming in the UK. But the industry is facing a severe shortage of new recruits. With the average age of a farmer at 58, the Royal Agricultural Society of England (RASE) report estimates the UK will need 60,000 new entrants over the next decade.

One of the biggest obstacles for aspiring farmers is the cost – especially the increasing price of farmland – and most opportunities arise through succession or inheritance. Startup costs are also high.

But there are encouraging signs. Demand for agricultural courses is increasing, reports Harper Adams University College, which has experienced an 11% increase over the last five years, while the Royal Agricultural College has seen demand increase by 8% this year. Russell Readman, agriculture course manager at Harper Adams, explains that the industry is in a more buoyant mood the key driver being the need to increase sustainable food production.

Graduates from agricultural courses enjoy exceptionally high employment rates, with Harper Adams in the top three in the country. Readman attributes this success to the year in industry all students undertake during their course, giving them exposure to the workplace and helping them gain key skills – both technical and interpersonal. Employer feedback is that these students have a can-do attitude, while "the applied nature of the courses demonstrates principles in practice".

The diversity of opportunities in farming also contributes to the high employment rates, according to Readman, with the sector offering roles in both food production and ancillary services. It's also a global industry and many students find their transferable skills are useful abroad.

So how can the farming sector attract potential recruits?


How to make farming an appealing career choice for a new generation

With the challenges of climate change and food and water security, there's never been a greater need for innovative, sustainable farming in the UK. But the industry is facing a severe shortage of new recruits. With the average age of a farmer at 58, the Royal Agricultural Society of England (RASE) report estimates the UK will need 60,000 new entrants over the next decade.

One of the biggest obstacles for aspiring farmers is the cost – especially the increasing price of farmland – and most opportunities arise through succession or inheritance. Startup costs are also high.

But there are encouraging signs. Demand for agricultural courses is increasing, reports Harper Adams University College, which has experienced an 11% increase over the last five years, while the Royal Agricultural College has seen demand increase by 8% this year. Russell Readman, agriculture course manager at Harper Adams, explains that the industry is in a more buoyant mood the key driver being the need to increase sustainable food production.

Graduates from agricultural courses enjoy exceptionally high employment rates, with Harper Adams in the top three in the country. Readman attributes this success to the year in industry all students undertake during their course, giving them exposure to the workplace and helping them gain key skills – both technical and interpersonal. Employer feedback is that these students have a can-do attitude, while "the applied nature of the courses demonstrates principles in practice".

The diversity of opportunities in farming also contributes to the high employment rates, according to Readman, with the sector offering roles in both food production and ancillary services. It's also a global industry and many students find their transferable skills are useful abroad.

So how can the farming sector attract potential recruits?


Watch the video: 2014 International Year of Family Farming (August 2022).