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Home > Kitchens Email this article Print this article Sarah Richardson's Ways to Personalize a Kitchen

Home > Kitchens Email this article Print this article Sarah Richardson's Ways to Personalize a Kitchen

"I'm an eager beaver who just wants to make things right," says interior designer Sarah Richardson. "Hopefully, people learn from my mistakes." A TV star in Canada with her own lines of paint and furniture, Richardson brings her girl-next-door vibe to the US on the HGTV shows Sarah's House and the upcoming Sarah 101. A democratizer of kitchen design, Richardson believes that people shouldn't have to spend a lot on high-end materials. Her shows teach viewers the small touches that give a kitchen personality, like adding bold colors, mosaic tiles and fabrics. She might upgrade stock cabinets, for example, by playing with wood grains and paint colors. While other designers have a signature look, Richardson seeks out simple but sophisticated design solutions that allow anyone to customize a kitchen, as in the rooms on these pages. She's a DIY cheerleader: "The main point of my shows is, 'Don't just buy someone else's renovation—do it yourself.'"

Mosaic Tiles

Richardson loves mosaic backsplashes, like the "Sunflower" pattern here, made from different types of marble: "Backsplashes are a wonderful place to integrate color and pattern into the kitchen." saltillo-tiles.com.

Salvaged Wood

To add style to stock cabinets, Richardson had them professionally spray-painted and added details like reclaimed wood. The tongue-and-groove paneling on the island, from an 1860s schoolhouse, influenced the room's colors.

Maximizing Storage

Richardson added drawers and a low countertop under the window to create a baking station, which both preserves natural light and uses every available bit of space.


Indoors and Outdoors Blend Together at This Beach House by Peter Dunham

Peter Dunham&rsquos clients had a big problem with the Hamptons: They were buzzing. And I&rsquom not alluding to the latest trendy boîtes teeming with well-heeled scenesters. The Southampton beach house the couple had rented, within walking distance to the village, &ldquowas incredibly noisy because people clipped hedges and mowed lawns all week long,&rdquo explains Dunham. &ldquoIt was kind of a good thing for them to figure out, This is driving us nuts!&rdquo Silence&mdashsave for the lapping of waves&mdashbecame a coveted amenity. Plus: &ldquoThe husband is a water man,&rdquo the Los Angeles&ndashbased designer says. &ldquoRestricted in a suburban house behind hedges, it&rsquos no wonder he was withering.&rdquo

After looking at nearly 60 homes, his clients splurged on an 8,800-square-foot, 7-bedroom, 9-bath house on a cliff overlooking glimmering Shinnecock Bay. The lone issue? It was a new spec house, nearly devoid of soul. In came Dunham, the France-born, England-trained prince of patterned prints. &ldquoIn all these spec houses, you need to layer in some personality. You have to give spaces their identity.&rdquo

Dunham began by sheathing much of the interior in Benjamin Moore&rsquos Simply White (&ldquoit&rsquos clean, it&rsquos airy, it&rsquos bright&rdquo). Key rooms, on the other hand, received a colorful treatment: &ldquoYou&rsquore looking for ways to vary the notes so the whole house is not blue and white.&rdquo The designer installed a real wood wallcovering&mdashde facto planking&mdashin the den, and custom blue milk paint in the downstairs guest bedroom.

Because the couple have two frequently visiting grandchildren and another on the way, they asked for fuss-free, hard-wearing materials. Dunham selected performance fabrics and bold antique carpets that could take a beating (because they already had&mdashfor decades).

Throughout, abundant pattern cuts any sameness. But how do you mix prints without summoning a dizzy spell? &ldquoIt&rsquos a balance, almost like cooking, the way you have a rich sauce next to a plain piece of fish,&rdquo Dunham says. &ldquoI&rsquoll add something like a paisley with stripes and then throw some solid in with the trim.&rdquo The final effect is as lively and deep as the bay beyond the windows. &ldquoTo me, the atmosphere is way more important than the look,&rdquo Dunham says. &ldquoYou don&rsquot want guests to feel intimidated by your 10,000-square-foot house on the water. It should feel like they can kick off their shoes.&rdquo

&ldquoOrange is a great color that&rsquos not hot like red,&rdquo says Dunham, who added a tiny bit as trim on the window treatments to play off the sofa. Wallcovering: Nobilis. Sofa, pillows, and ottoman: Hollywood at Home (sofa in a Pindler fabric and ottoman in vintage textile). Floor poufs: Mecox. Window shades: Pindler.


Indoors and Outdoors Blend Together at This Beach House by Peter Dunham

Peter Dunham&rsquos clients had a big problem with the Hamptons: They were buzzing. And I&rsquom not alluding to the latest trendy boîtes teeming with well-heeled scenesters. The Southampton beach house the couple had rented, within walking distance to the village, &ldquowas incredibly noisy because people clipped hedges and mowed lawns all week long,&rdquo explains Dunham. &ldquoIt was kind of a good thing for them to figure out, This is driving us nuts!&rdquo Silence&mdashsave for the lapping of waves&mdashbecame a coveted amenity. Plus: &ldquoThe husband is a water man,&rdquo the Los Angeles&ndashbased designer says. &ldquoRestricted in a suburban house behind hedges, it&rsquos no wonder he was withering.&rdquo

After looking at nearly 60 homes, his clients splurged on an 8,800-square-foot, 7-bedroom, 9-bath house on a cliff overlooking glimmering Shinnecock Bay. The lone issue? It was a new spec house, nearly devoid of soul. In came Dunham, the France-born, England-trained prince of patterned prints. &ldquoIn all these spec houses, you need to layer in some personality. You have to give spaces their identity.&rdquo

Dunham began by sheathing much of the interior in Benjamin Moore&rsquos Simply White (&ldquoit&rsquos clean, it&rsquos airy, it&rsquos bright&rdquo). Key rooms, on the other hand, received a colorful treatment: &ldquoYou&rsquore looking for ways to vary the notes so the whole house is not blue and white.&rdquo The designer installed a real wood wallcovering&mdashde facto planking&mdashin the den, and custom blue milk paint in the downstairs guest bedroom.

Because the couple have two frequently visiting grandchildren and another on the way, they asked for fuss-free, hard-wearing materials. Dunham selected performance fabrics and bold antique carpets that could take a beating (because they already had&mdashfor decades).

Throughout, abundant pattern cuts any sameness. But how do you mix prints without summoning a dizzy spell? &ldquoIt&rsquos a balance, almost like cooking, the way you have a rich sauce next to a plain piece of fish,&rdquo Dunham says. &ldquoI&rsquoll add something like a paisley with stripes and then throw some solid in with the trim.&rdquo The final effect is as lively and deep as the bay beyond the windows. &ldquoTo me, the atmosphere is way more important than the look,&rdquo Dunham says. &ldquoYou don&rsquot want guests to feel intimidated by your 10,000-square-foot house on the water. It should feel like they can kick off their shoes.&rdquo

&ldquoOrange is a great color that&rsquos not hot like red,&rdquo says Dunham, who added a tiny bit as trim on the window treatments to play off the sofa. Wallcovering: Nobilis. Sofa, pillows, and ottoman: Hollywood at Home (sofa in a Pindler fabric and ottoman in vintage textile). Floor poufs: Mecox. Window shades: Pindler.


Indoors and Outdoors Blend Together at This Beach House by Peter Dunham

Peter Dunham&rsquos clients had a big problem with the Hamptons: They were buzzing. And I&rsquom not alluding to the latest trendy boîtes teeming with well-heeled scenesters. The Southampton beach house the couple had rented, within walking distance to the village, &ldquowas incredibly noisy because people clipped hedges and mowed lawns all week long,&rdquo explains Dunham. &ldquoIt was kind of a good thing for them to figure out, This is driving us nuts!&rdquo Silence&mdashsave for the lapping of waves&mdashbecame a coveted amenity. Plus: &ldquoThe husband is a water man,&rdquo the Los Angeles&ndashbased designer says. &ldquoRestricted in a suburban house behind hedges, it&rsquos no wonder he was withering.&rdquo

After looking at nearly 60 homes, his clients splurged on an 8,800-square-foot, 7-bedroom, 9-bath house on a cliff overlooking glimmering Shinnecock Bay. The lone issue? It was a new spec house, nearly devoid of soul. In came Dunham, the France-born, England-trained prince of patterned prints. &ldquoIn all these spec houses, you need to layer in some personality. You have to give spaces their identity.&rdquo

Dunham began by sheathing much of the interior in Benjamin Moore&rsquos Simply White (&ldquoit&rsquos clean, it&rsquos airy, it&rsquos bright&rdquo). Key rooms, on the other hand, received a colorful treatment: &ldquoYou&rsquore looking for ways to vary the notes so the whole house is not blue and white.&rdquo The designer installed a real wood wallcovering&mdashde facto planking&mdashin the den, and custom blue milk paint in the downstairs guest bedroom.

Because the couple have two frequently visiting grandchildren and another on the way, they asked for fuss-free, hard-wearing materials. Dunham selected performance fabrics and bold antique carpets that could take a beating (because they already had&mdashfor decades).

Throughout, abundant pattern cuts any sameness. But how do you mix prints without summoning a dizzy spell? &ldquoIt&rsquos a balance, almost like cooking, the way you have a rich sauce next to a plain piece of fish,&rdquo Dunham says. &ldquoI&rsquoll add something like a paisley with stripes and then throw some solid in with the trim.&rdquo The final effect is as lively and deep as the bay beyond the windows. &ldquoTo me, the atmosphere is way more important than the look,&rdquo Dunham says. &ldquoYou don&rsquot want guests to feel intimidated by your 10,000-square-foot house on the water. It should feel like they can kick off their shoes.&rdquo

&ldquoOrange is a great color that&rsquos not hot like red,&rdquo says Dunham, who added a tiny bit as trim on the window treatments to play off the sofa. Wallcovering: Nobilis. Sofa, pillows, and ottoman: Hollywood at Home (sofa in a Pindler fabric and ottoman in vintage textile). Floor poufs: Mecox. Window shades: Pindler.


Indoors and Outdoors Blend Together at This Beach House by Peter Dunham

Peter Dunham&rsquos clients had a big problem with the Hamptons: They were buzzing. And I&rsquom not alluding to the latest trendy boîtes teeming with well-heeled scenesters. The Southampton beach house the couple had rented, within walking distance to the village, &ldquowas incredibly noisy because people clipped hedges and mowed lawns all week long,&rdquo explains Dunham. &ldquoIt was kind of a good thing for them to figure out, This is driving us nuts!&rdquo Silence&mdashsave for the lapping of waves&mdashbecame a coveted amenity. Plus: &ldquoThe husband is a water man,&rdquo the Los Angeles&ndashbased designer says. &ldquoRestricted in a suburban house behind hedges, it&rsquos no wonder he was withering.&rdquo

After looking at nearly 60 homes, his clients splurged on an 8,800-square-foot, 7-bedroom, 9-bath house on a cliff overlooking glimmering Shinnecock Bay. The lone issue? It was a new spec house, nearly devoid of soul. In came Dunham, the France-born, England-trained prince of patterned prints. &ldquoIn all these spec houses, you need to layer in some personality. You have to give spaces their identity.&rdquo

Dunham began by sheathing much of the interior in Benjamin Moore&rsquos Simply White (&ldquoit&rsquos clean, it&rsquos airy, it&rsquos bright&rdquo). Key rooms, on the other hand, received a colorful treatment: &ldquoYou&rsquore looking for ways to vary the notes so the whole house is not blue and white.&rdquo The designer installed a real wood wallcovering&mdashde facto planking&mdashin the den, and custom blue milk paint in the downstairs guest bedroom.

Because the couple have two frequently visiting grandchildren and another on the way, they asked for fuss-free, hard-wearing materials. Dunham selected performance fabrics and bold antique carpets that could take a beating (because they already had&mdashfor decades).

Throughout, abundant pattern cuts any sameness. But how do you mix prints without summoning a dizzy spell? &ldquoIt&rsquos a balance, almost like cooking, the way you have a rich sauce next to a plain piece of fish,&rdquo Dunham says. &ldquoI&rsquoll add something like a paisley with stripes and then throw some solid in with the trim.&rdquo The final effect is as lively and deep as the bay beyond the windows. &ldquoTo me, the atmosphere is way more important than the look,&rdquo Dunham says. &ldquoYou don&rsquot want guests to feel intimidated by your 10,000-square-foot house on the water. It should feel like they can kick off their shoes.&rdquo

&ldquoOrange is a great color that&rsquos not hot like red,&rdquo says Dunham, who added a tiny bit as trim on the window treatments to play off the sofa. Wallcovering: Nobilis. Sofa, pillows, and ottoman: Hollywood at Home (sofa in a Pindler fabric and ottoman in vintage textile). Floor poufs: Mecox. Window shades: Pindler.


Indoors and Outdoors Blend Together at This Beach House by Peter Dunham

Peter Dunham&rsquos clients had a big problem with the Hamptons: They were buzzing. And I&rsquom not alluding to the latest trendy boîtes teeming with well-heeled scenesters. The Southampton beach house the couple had rented, within walking distance to the village, &ldquowas incredibly noisy because people clipped hedges and mowed lawns all week long,&rdquo explains Dunham. &ldquoIt was kind of a good thing for them to figure out, This is driving us nuts!&rdquo Silence&mdashsave for the lapping of waves&mdashbecame a coveted amenity. Plus: &ldquoThe husband is a water man,&rdquo the Los Angeles&ndashbased designer says. &ldquoRestricted in a suburban house behind hedges, it&rsquos no wonder he was withering.&rdquo

After looking at nearly 60 homes, his clients splurged on an 8,800-square-foot, 7-bedroom, 9-bath house on a cliff overlooking glimmering Shinnecock Bay. The lone issue? It was a new spec house, nearly devoid of soul. In came Dunham, the France-born, England-trained prince of patterned prints. &ldquoIn all these spec houses, you need to layer in some personality. You have to give spaces their identity.&rdquo

Dunham began by sheathing much of the interior in Benjamin Moore&rsquos Simply White (&ldquoit&rsquos clean, it&rsquos airy, it&rsquos bright&rdquo). Key rooms, on the other hand, received a colorful treatment: &ldquoYou&rsquore looking for ways to vary the notes so the whole house is not blue and white.&rdquo The designer installed a real wood wallcovering&mdashde facto planking&mdashin the den, and custom blue milk paint in the downstairs guest bedroom.

Because the couple have two frequently visiting grandchildren and another on the way, they asked for fuss-free, hard-wearing materials. Dunham selected performance fabrics and bold antique carpets that could take a beating (because they already had&mdashfor decades).

Throughout, abundant pattern cuts any sameness. But how do you mix prints without summoning a dizzy spell? &ldquoIt&rsquos a balance, almost like cooking, the way you have a rich sauce next to a plain piece of fish,&rdquo Dunham says. &ldquoI&rsquoll add something like a paisley with stripes and then throw some solid in with the trim.&rdquo The final effect is as lively and deep as the bay beyond the windows. &ldquoTo me, the atmosphere is way more important than the look,&rdquo Dunham says. &ldquoYou don&rsquot want guests to feel intimidated by your 10,000-square-foot house on the water. It should feel like they can kick off their shoes.&rdquo

&ldquoOrange is a great color that&rsquos not hot like red,&rdquo says Dunham, who added a tiny bit as trim on the window treatments to play off the sofa. Wallcovering: Nobilis. Sofa, pillows, and ottoman: Hollywood at Home (sofa in a Pindler fabric and ottoman in vintage textile). Floor poufs: Mecox. Window shades: Pindler.


Indoors and Outdoors Blend Together at This Beach House by Peter Dunham

Peter Dunham&rsquos clients had a big problem with the Hamptons: They were buzzing. And I&rsquom not alluding to the latest trendy boîtes teeming with well-heeled scenesters. The Southampton beach house the couple had rented, within walking distance to the village, &ldquowas incredibly noisy because people clipped hedges and mowed lawns all week long,&rdquo explains Dunham. &ldquoIt was kind of a good thing for them to figure out, This is driving us nuts!&rdquo Silence&mdashsave for the lapping of waves&mdashbecame a coveted amenity. Plus: &ldquoThe husband is a water man,&rdquo the Los Angeles&ndashbased designer says. &ldquoRestricted in a suburban house behind hedges, it&rsquos no wonder he was withering.&rdquo

After looking at nearly 60 homes, his clients splurged on an 8,800-square-foot, 7-bedroom, 9-bath house on a cliff overlooking glimmering Shinnecock Bay. The lone issue? It was a new spec house, nearly devoid of soul. In came Dunham, the France-born, England-trained prince of patterned prints. &ldquoIn all these spec houses, you need to layer in some personality. You have to give spaces their identity.&rdquo

Dunham began by sheathing much of the interior in Benjamin Moore&rsquos Simply White (&ldquoit&rsquos clean, it&rsquos airy, it&rsquos bright&rdquo). Key rooms, on the other hand, received a colorful treatment: &ldquoYou&rsquore looking for ways to vary the notes so the whole house is not blue and white.&rdquo The designer installed a real wood wallcovering&mdashde facto planking&mdashin the den, and custom blue milk paint in the downstairs guest bedroom.

Because the couple have two frequently visiting grandchildren and another on the way, they asked for fuss-free, hard-wearing materials. Dunham selected performance fabrics and bold antique carpets that could take a beating (because they already had&mdashfor decades).

Throughout, abundant pattern cuts any sameness. But how do you mix prints without summoning a dizzy spell? &ldquoIt&rsquos a balance, almost like cooking, the way you have a rich sauce next to a plain piece of fish,&rdquo Dunham says. &ldquoI&rsquoll add something like a paisley with stripes and then throw some solid in with the trim.&rdquo The final effect is as lively and deep as the bay beyond the windows. &ldquoTo me, the atmosphere is way more important than the look,&rdquo Dunham says. &ldquoYou don&rsquot want guests to feel intimidated by your 10,000-square-foot house on the water. It should feel like they can kick off their shoes.&rdquo

&ldquoOrange is a great color that&rsquos not hot like red,&rdquo says Dunham, who added a tiny bit as trim on the window treatments to play off the sofa. Wallcovering: Nobilis. Sofa, pillows, and ottoman: Hollywood at Home (sofa in a Pindler fabric and ottoman in vintage textile). Floor poufs: Mecox. Window shades: Pindler.


Indoors and Outdoors Blend Together at This Beach House by Peter Dunham

Peter Dunham&rsquos clients had a big problem with the Hamptons: They were buzzing. And I&rsquom not alluding to the latest trendy boîtes teeming with well-heeled scenesters. The Southampton beach house the couple had rented, within walking distance to the village, &ldquowas incredibly noisy because people clipped hedges and mowed lawns all week long,&rdquo explains Dunham. &ldquoIt was kind of a good thing for them to figure out, This is driving us nuts!&rdquo Silence&mdashsave for the lapping of waves&mdashbecame a coveted amenity. Plus: &ldquoThe husband is a water man,&rdquo the Los Angeles&ndashbased designer says. &ldquoRestricted in a suburban house behind hedges, it&rsquos no wonder he was withering.&rdquo

After looking at nearly 60 homes, his clients splurged on an 8,800-square-foot, 7-bedroom, 9-bath house on a cliff overlooking glimmering Shinnecock Bay. The lone issue? It was a new spec house, nearly devoid of soul. In came Dunham, the France-born, England-trained prince of patterned prints. &ldquoIn all these spec houses, you need to layer in some personality. You have to give spaces their identity.&rdquo

Dunham began by sheathing much of the interior in Benjamin Moore&rsquos Simply White (&ldquoit&rsquos clean, it&rsquos airy, it&rsquos bright&rdquo). Key rooms, on the other hand, received a colorful treatment: &ldquoYou&rsquore looking for ways to vary the notes so the whole house is not blue and white.&rdquo The designer installed a real wood wallcovering&mdashde facto planking&mdashin the den, and custom blue milk paint in the downstairs guest bedroom.

Because the couple have two frequently visiting grandchildren and another on the way, they asked for fuss-free, hard-wearing materials. Dunham selected performance fabrics and bold antique carpets that could take a beating (because they already had&mdashfor decades).

Throughout, abundant pattern cuts any sameness. But how do you mix prints without summoning a dizzy spell? &ldquoIt&rsquos a balance, almost like cooking, the way you have a rich sauce next to a plain piece of fish,&rdquo Dunham says. &ldquoI&rsquoll add something like a paisley with stripes and then throw some solid in with the trim.&rdquo The final effect is as lively and deep as the bay beyond the windows. &ldquoTo me, the atmosphere is way more important than the look,&rdquo Dunham says. &ldquoYou don&rsquot want guests to feel intimidated by your 10,000-square-foot house on the water. It should feel like they can kick off their shoes.&rdquo

&ldquoOrange is a great color that&rsquos not hot like red,&rdquo says Dunham, who added a tiny bit as trim on the window treatments to play off the sofa. Wallcovering: Nobilis. Sofa, pillows, and ottoman: Hollywood at Home (sofa in a Pindler fabric and ottoman in vintage textile). Floor poufs: Mecox. Window shades: Pindler.


Indoors and Outdoors Blend Together at This Beach House by Peter Dunham

Peter Dunham&rsquos clients had a big problem with the Hamptons: They were buzzing. And I&rsquom not alluding to the latest trendy boîtes teeming with well-heeled scenesters. The Southampton beach house the couple had rented, within walking distance to the village, &ldquowas incredibly noisy because people clipped hedges and mowed lawns all week long,&rdquo explains Dunham. &ldquoIt was kind of a good thing for them to figure out, This is driving us nuts!&rdquo Silence&mdashsave for the lapping of waves&mdashbecame a coveted amenity. Plus: &ldquoThe husband is a water man,&rdquo the Los Angeles&ndashbased designer says. &ldquoRestricted in a suburban house behind hedges, it&rsquos no wonder he was withering.&rdquo

After looking at nearly 60 homes, his clients splurged on an 8,800-square-foot, 7-bedroom, 9-bath house on a cliff overlooking glimmering Shinnecock Bay. The lone issue? It was a new spec house, nearly devoid of soul. In came Dunham, the France-born, England-trained prince of patterned prints. &ldquoIn all these spec houses, you need to layer in some personality. You have to give spaces their identity.&rdquo

Dunham began by sheathing much of the interior in Benjamin Moore&rsquos Simply White (&ldquoit&rsquos clean, it&rsquos airy, it&rsquos bright&rdquo). Key rooms, on the other hand, received a colorful treatment: &ldquoYou&rsquore looking for ways to vary the notes so the whole house is not blue and white.&rdquo The designer installed a real wood wallcovering&mdashde facto planking&mdashin the den, and custom blue milk paint in the downstairs guest bedroom.

Because the couple have two frequently visiting grandchildren and another on the way, they asked for fuss-free, hard-wearing materials. Dunham selected performance fabrics and bold antique carpets that could take a beating (because they already had&mdashfor decades).

Throughout, abundant pattern cuts any sameness. But how do you mix prints without summoning a dizzy spell? &ldquoIt&rsquos a balance, almost like cooking, the way you have a rich sauce next to a plain piece of fish,&rdquo Dunham says. &ldquoI&rsquoll add something like a paisley with stripes and then throw some solid in with the trim.&rdquo The final effect is as lively and deep as the bay beyond the windows. &ldquoTo me, the atmosphere is way more important than the look,&rdquo Dunham says. &ldquoYou don&rsquot want guests to feel intimidated by your 10,000-square-foot house on the water. It should feel like they can kick off their shoes.&rdquo

&ldquoOrange is a great color that&rsquos not hot like red,&rdquo says Dunham, who added a tiny bit as trim on the window treatments to play off the sofa. Wallcovering: Nobilis. Sofa, pillows, and ottoman: Hollywood at Home (sofa in a Pindler fabric and ottoman in vintage textile). Floor poufs: Mecox. Window shades: Pindler.


Indoors and Outdoors Blend Together at This Beach House by Peter Dunham

Peter Dunham&rsquos clients had a big problem with the Hamptons: They were buzzing. And I&rsquom not alluding to the latest trendy boîtes teeming with well-heeled scenesters. The Southampton beach house the couple had rented, within walking distance to the village, &ldquowas incredibly noisy because people clipped hedges and mowed lawns all week long,&rdquo explains Dunham. &ldquoIt was kind of a good thing for them to figure out, This is driving us nuts!&rdquo Silence&mdashsave for the lapping of waves&mdashbecame a coveted amenity. Plus: &ldquoThe husband is a water man,&rdquo the Los Angeles&ndashbased designer says. &ldquoRestricted in a suburban house behind hedges, it&rsquos no wonder he was withering.&rdquo

After looking at nearly 60 homes, his clients splurged on an 8,800-square-foot, 7-bedroom, 9-bath house on a cliff overlooking glimmering Shinnecock Bay. The lone issue? It was a new spec house, nearly devoid of soul. In came Dunham, the France-born, England-trained prince of patterned prints. &ldquoIn all these spec houses, you need to layer in some personality. You have to give spaces their identity.&rdquo

Dunham began by sheathing much of the interior in Benjamin Moore&rsquos Simply White (&ldquoit&rsquos clean, it&rsquos airy, it&rsquos bright&rdquo). Key rooms, on the other hand, received a colorful treatment: &ldquoYou&rsquore looking for ways to vary the notes so the whole house is not blue and white.&rdquo The designer installed a real wood wallcovering&mdashde facto planking&mdashin the den, and custom blue milk paint in the downstairs guest bedroom.

Because the couple have two frequently visiting grandchildren and another on the way, they asked for fuss-free, hard-wearing materials. Dunham selected performance fabrics and bold antique carpets that could take a beating (because they already had&mdashfor decades).

Throughout, abundant pattern cuts any sameness. But how do you mix prints without summoning a dizzy spell? &ldquoIt&rsquos a balance, almost like cooking, the way you have a rich sauce next to a plain piece of fish,&rdquo Dunham says. &ldquoI&rsquoll add something like a paisley with stripes and then throw some solid in with the trim.&rdquo The final effect is as lively and deep as the bay beyond the windows. &ldquoTo me, the atmosphere is way more important than the look,&rdquo Dunham says. &ldquoYou don&rsquot want guests to feel intimidated by your 10,000-square-foot house on the water. It should feel like they can kick off their shoes.&rdquo

&ldquoOrange is a great color that&rsquos not hot like red,&rdquo says Dunham, who added a tiny bit as trim on the window treatments to play off the sofa. Wallcovering: Nobilis. Sofa, pillows, and ottoman: Hollywood at Home (sofa in a Pindler fabric and ottoman in vintage textile). Floor poufs: Mecox. Window shades: Pindler.


Indoors and Outdoors Blend Together at This Beach House by Peter Dunham

Peter Dunham&rsquos clients had a big problem with the Hamptons: They were buzzing. And I&rsquom not alluding to the latest trendy boîtes teeming with well-heeled scenesters. The Southampton beach house the couple had rented, within walking distance to the village, &ldquowas incredibly noisy because people clipped hedges and mowed lawns all week long,&rdquo explains Dunham. &ldquoIt was kind of a good thing for them to figure out, This is driving us nuts!&rdquo Silence&mdashsave for the lapping of waves&mdashbecame a coveted amenity. Plus: &ldquoThe husband is a water man,&rdquo the Los Angeles&ndashbased designer says. &ldquoRestricted in a suburban house behind hedges, it&rsquos no wonder he was withering.&rdquo

After looking at nearly 60 homes, his clients splurged on an 8,800-square-foot, 7-bedroom, 9-bath house on a cliff overlooking glimmering Shinnecock Bay. The lone issue? It was a new spec house, nearly devoid of soul. In came Dunham, the France-born, England-trained prince of patterned prints. &ldquoIn all these spec houses, you need to layer in some personality. You have to give spaces their identity.&rdquo

Dunham began by sheathing much of the interior in Benjamin Moore&rsquos Simply White (&ldquoit&rsquos clean, it&rsquos airy, it&rsquos bright&rdquo). Key rooms, on the other hand, received a colorful treatment: &ldquoYou&rsquore looking for ways to vary the notes so the whole house is not blue and white.&rdquo The designer installed a real wood wallcovering&mdashde facto planking&mdashin the den, and custom blue milk paint in the downstairs guest bedroom.

Because the couple have two frequently visiting grandchildren and another on the way, they asked for fuss-free, hard-wearing materials. Dunham selected performance fabrics and bold antique carpets that could take a beating (because they already had&mdashfor decades).

Throughout, abundant pattern cuts any sameness. But how do you mix prints without summoning a dizzy spell? &ldquoIt&rsquos a balance, almost like cooking, the way you have a rich sauce next to a plain piece of fish,&rdquo Dunham says. &ldquoI&rsquoll add something like a paisley with stripes and then throw some solid in with the trim.&rdquo The final effect is as lively and deep as the bay beyond the windows. &ldquoTo me, the atmosphere is way more important than the look,&rdquo Dunham says. &ldquoYou don&rsquot want guests to feel intimidated by your 10,000-square-foot house on the water. It should feel like they can kick off their shoes.&rdquo

&ldquoOrange is a great color that&rsquos not hot like red,&rdquo says Dunham, who added a tiny bit as trim on the window treatments to play off the sofa. Wallcovering: Nobilis. Sofa, pillows, and ottoman: Hollywood at Home (sofa in a Pindler fabric and ottoman in vintage textile). Floor poufs: Mecox. Window shades: Pindler.


Watch the video: Kitchen Tips and Tricks: What Colour Should My Kitchen Be? White Or Grey? - Ask Me Anything! (December 2021).