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Ditch Plains Clambake

Ditch Plains Clambake



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Ingredients

  • 6 russet potatoes
  • 1/4 -1/3 cup olive oil
  • 1 medium-sized yellow onion, chopped
  • 6 medium-sized cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 Cup dry white wine
  • 2 Cups clam juice
  • 1 bunch basil, chopped
  • 1 bunch parsley, chopped
  • 2 leeks, sliced thinly
  • 2 Tablespoons chopped fresh ginger
  • 1 Teaspoon saffron threads
  • 1 Teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • Two 1 3/4-pound lobsters
  • 1 Pound king-crab or snow-crab legs
  • 1 -2 dozen littleneck clams, scrubbed
  • 1 Pound mussels, scrubbed
  • 8 Ounces large shrimp, shelled and deveined
  • 8 Ounces sea scallops
  • 1 Pound cod fillets
  • 2 lemons, sliced
  • Garlic bread, for serving

Directions

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Bake the potatoes until tender, about 1 hour. Heat the oil in a large pot over medium heat and sauté the onion and garlic until golden brown. Add the wine and bring to a boil. Add the clam juice, basil, parsley, leeks, ginger, saffron, and red pepper flakes. Season with salt and pepper, to taste.

Add enough water — approximately 4 quarts — to cover the seafood when it's added. Bring to a boil. Drop in the lobsters and crab legs and boil for about 10 minutes.

Drop in the clams, mussels, shrimp, scallops, and cod. Cook for another 10 minutes. Remove the pot from the heat and serve immediately, accompanied by the baked potatoes, sliced lemons, and garlic bread.

Nutritional Facts

Servings6

Calories Per Serving863

Folate equivalent (total)193µg48%

Riboflavin (B2)0.4mg25.7%


10 Restaurant-Worthy Seafood Dishes to Cook at Home

If you’re like many other home cooks this past year, maybe you’ve found yourself stretching your culinary limits with each new kitchen creation. Perhaps you’ve tried baking a soufflé or attempting a lookalike recipe of your favorite restaurant dish. (Or maybe you’ve even tried your hand at baking bread—gasp!)

One thing many cooking novices tend to shy away from is seafood recipes, whether for lack of experience or due to limited resources.

However, this beloved food group is not as tricky to get right as it may seem. So—if you’ve been holding off on your favorite lobster, crab, shrimp, or shellfish dish until you can resume indoor restaurant dining again, then these recipes are for you!


Recipe Summary

  • Coarse salt
  • 1 pound elbow pasta
  • 2 cups milk
  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • 3 1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1/3 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 pound white American cheese, cut into 1/2-inch pieces, room temperature
  • 1/2 pound Gruyere, grated, room temperature
  • 1/3 cup grated Parmesan, room temperature
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 8 hot dogs
  • 8 potato hot dog buns

Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat generously salt water and return to a boil. Add pasta and cook until al dente according to package directions, 7 to 8 minutes. Drain and set aside.

In a medium saucepan, heat milk and heavy cream over medium-low heat until warmed through.

Meanwhile, in a large saucepan, melt butter over medium heat. Add flour and stir until well combined, 5 to 6 minutes, taking care not to let the mixture brown. Slowly add milk mixture, whisking until well combined. Bring to a simmer and let cook 15 minutes.

Whisk in cheese until melted and sauce has thickened remove from heat. Using an immersion blender, blend mixture until smooth season with 1 teaspoon salt and pepper. Stir in pasta until fully coated set macaroni and cheese aside.

Preheat a grill pan over medium-high heat.

Grill hot dogs until cooked through, 5 to 7 minutes. Transfer hot dogs to buns, and top each with about 1/3 cup reserved macaroni and cheese. Serve immediately.


Step-by-step indoor clambake

For this clambake, you'll need the following ingredients. The subsequent photos in this gallery give step-by-step instructions.
3/4 cup olive oil
5 large onions, cut into wedges about 1-inch thick
6 large carrots, cleaned, quartered lengthwise and cut into 3-inch lengths 6 stalks celery
Salt and freshly ground pepper
8 large sprigs each fresh Italian parsley, thyme and marjoram or oregano
4 bay leaves
2 cups dry white wine
6 to 8 ears of corn, husked and broken into 3-inch pieces (reserve husks)
3 pounds small new potatoes (if any larger than 1 1/2 inches, cut in half)
1 pound linguiça, kielbasa or chorizo sausage, sliced 1-inch thick
2 dozen littleneck clams
2 pounds mussels
24 large shrimp
2 to 3 (1 1/2-pound) live lobsters
Drawn butter (recipe follows) (Photo by Timothy Fadek / July 15, 2009) Credit: Timothy Fadek

This recipe for an indoor clambake was developed by Polly Talbott, owner of A la Carte Cooking School in Lynbrook.

For this clambake, you'll need the following ingredients. The subsequent photos in this gallery give step-by-step instructions.
3/4 cup olive oil
5 large onions, cut into wedges about 1-inch thick
6 large carrots, cleaned, quartered lengthwise and cut into 3-inch lengths 6 stalks celery
Salt and freshly ground pepper
8 large sprigs each fresh Italian parsley, thyme and marjoram or oregano
4 bay leaves
2 cups dry white wine
6 to 8 ears of corn, husked and broken into 3-inch pieces (reserve husks)
3 pounds small new potatoes (if any larger than 1 1/2 inches, cut in half)
1 pound linguiça, kielbasa or chorizo sausage, sliced 1-inch thick
2 dozen littleneck clams
2 pounds mussels
24 large shrimp
2 to 3 (1 1/2-pound) live lobsters
Drawn butter (recipe follows) (Photo by Timothy Fadek / July 15, 2009)

Step 1: Put oil, onions, carrots and celery along with a good sprinkling of salt and pepper in the pot and ?sweat? them over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, until they are soft and just starting to color, 12 to 15 minutes. (Photo by Timothy Fadek / July 15, 2009)

Step 2: Add herbs and wine to the pot, then cover everything with a double layer of corn husks to separate the aromatics from the rest of the ingredients. (Photo by Timothy Fadek / July 15, 2009)

Step 3: On top of the husks, layer ? in this order ? the potatoes, corn, sausage, clams and mussels, sprinkling each new layer with a little salt and pepper. (Photo by Timothy Fadek / July 15, 2009)

Step 4: Top with the shrimp and nestle in the lobsters. Cover the pot and make sure the lid is tight, weighing it down with some bricks or cans. (Or, you can seal the pot with heavy-duty aluminum foil, and place lid on top of that.) Cook over high heat until the steam just becomes lively and begins to escape from the lid, about 15 minutes, then reduce heat to medium and cook for another 15 minutes. (Photo by Timothy Fadek / July 15, 2009)

Step 5: Open the pot and check to see that the lobsters are bright red, the clams and mussels are open and the potatoes are done ? a fork or cake tester should slide in easily. Remove lobsters, and then the rest of the ingredients, discarding any clams or mussels that didn?t open. When you get down to the layer of husks, fish out the vegetables, and discard everything except the carrots, which are delicious and can be served as a side dish. Pour the remaining broth through a colander, pressing out all liquid, and keep warm. (Photo by Timothy Fadek / July 15, 2009)

Step 6: To serve, just dump everything out onto a table covered with brown paper, or arrange the ingredients prettily on one or two platters. Serve with the warm broth, drawn butter and plenty of paper towels. Makes 8 to 10 servings.
Polly Talbott, owner of A la Carte cooking School, shows off the finished indoor clambake. (Photo by Timothy Fadek / July 15, 2009)
DRAWN BUTTER: Place 3 sticks of butter in a microwavable vessel (i.e., a large Pyrex measuring cup) and cover with plastic wrap. Microwave until butter is fully melted and white ?milk solids? have risen to the top and fallen to the bottom. Peel off plastic wrap carefully ? there will be a blast of steam ? and skim off the ?top? milk solids with a spoon. Pour the butter into another bowl, taking care to leave the bottom milk solids in the first vessel. Makes 1 1/2 cups.

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INDOOR CLAMBAKE

This recipe was developed by Polly Talbott, owner of A la Carte Cooking School in Lynbrook.

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5 large onions, cut into wedges about 1-inch thick

6 large carrots, cleaned, quartered lengthwise and cut into 3-inch lengths

Salt and freshly ground pepper

8 large sprigs each fresh Italian parsley, thyme and marjoram or oregano

6 to 8 ears of corn, husked and broken into 3-inch pieces (reserve husks)

3 pounds small new potatoes (if any larger than 11/2 inches, cut in half)

1 pound linguiça, kielbasa or chorizo sausage, sliced 1-inch thick

2 to 3 (11/2-pound) live lobsters

1. Put oil, onions, carrots and celery along with a good sprinkling of salt and pepper in the pot and "sweat” them over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, until they are soft and just starting to color, 12 to 15 minutes.

2. Add herbs and wine to the pot, then cover everything with a double layer of corn husks to separate the aromatics from the rest of the ingredients. On top of the husks, layer -- in this order -- the potatoes, corn, sausage, clams and mussels, sprinkling each new layer with a little salt and pepper. Top with the shrimp and nestle in the lobsters.

3. Cover the pot and make sure the lid is tight, weighing it down with some bricks or cans. (Or, you can seal the pot with heavy-duty aluminum foil, and place lid on top of that.) Cook over high heat until the steam just becomes lively and begins to escape from the lid, about 15 minutes, then reduce heat to medium and cook for another 15 minutes.

4. Open the pot and check to see that the lobsters are bright red, the clams and mussels are open and the potatoes are done -- a fork or cake tester should slide in easily. Remove lobsters, and then the rest of the ingredients, discarding any clams or mussels that didn't open.

5. When you get down to the layer of husks, fish out the vegetables, and discard everything except the carrots, which are delicious and can be served as a side dish. Pour the remaining broth through a colander, pressing out all liquid, and keep warm.

6. To serve, just dump everything out onto a table covered with brown paper, or arrange the ingredients prettily on one or two platters. Serve with the warm broth, drawn butter and plenty of paper towels. Makes 8 to 10 servings.


Recipe Summary

  • 8 medium red potatoes, scrubbed
  • 1 pound clams in shell, scrubbed
  • 1 pound mussels, cleaned and debearded
  • ½ pound unpeeled large shrimp
  • 1 (48 fluid ounce) can chicken broth
  • ¼ cup dry vermouth (Optional)
  • 1 ½ cups butter, divided
  • 1 loaf French bread

Place a potatoes in a layer in the bottom of a large pot. Cover with a layer of clams, then mussels, and finally the shrimp. Pour in the vermouth and enough chicken broth to fill the pot halfway. You may not need all of the broth, depending on the size of your pot. Cut a half cup of the butter into cubes and place on top of the seafood. Cover with a lid, and seal tightly with aluminum foil.

Bring to a boil, then simmer over medium-low heat for 45 minutes. Remove from the heat, and carefully remove the foil and lid. Remove the seafood and potatoes from the liquid and serve on a large platter, family-style.

Melt 1/2 cup of reserved butter, and divide into 4 individual dishes for dipping. Serve with French bread and remaining softened butter for the bread.


Hi, I'm Daniela!
• I'M AN ORIGINAL •
In the food photography & styling world, I do both.
I’m self-trained in everything I do: chef, food photographer, food stylist, and recipe developer. I’m not trained in a particular photographic or food style I’ve arrived at my own. It’s why I’m unique.
I’m on a mission to help people see how sexy vegetables are—by sourcing the most colorful produce imaginable from local farm markets and emphasizing the beauty of real food in utterly enchanting food photography.
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Ditch Plains Lobster Roll

Make garlic confit. Add a cup of olive oil and the peeled cloves from a head of garlic to a small heavy saucepan. Let it simmer for 15 to 20 minutes on medium heat.

Step 2

Start the aioli. With a spoon, crush your garlic in a bowl, and mix in a quarter cup of Dijon mustard, a cup and a half of mayonnaise, and salt and pepper to taste.

Step 3

Make the lobster filling. Cut four to five pounds of cooked lobster meat into small pieces and place them in a bowl. Mix in a couple spoonfuls of aioli, a tablespoon of finely chopped tarragon, a tablespoon of finely chopped parsley, a cup of finely diced celery, half a cup of sliced scallions, and some Old Bay seasoning, salt, and pepper.

Step 4

Grill your rolls. Warm the grill pan on your stove and grease it with olive oil. Place the rolls face down on the pan. Prepare to butter your rolls by melting three tablespoons of butter in a small saucepan.

Step 5

Butter the rolls with the melted butter. Add lobster salad to the rolls and serve!


Pan-Seared Duck Breast

"A lot of people tell me that they&rsquore too intimidated to cook duck and only order it at restaurants. This is really too bad, as duck is pretty easy to make, and thanks to a layer of fat, the meat is flavorful and moist. This is a straightforward and simple recipe. It gets a little decadent at the end with foie gras, but you can manage without it just fine. Just don&rsquot skip the demi-glace&mdashit&rsquos the secret ingredient to this dish. These days, many stores carry prepared demi-glace that you just have to loosen up with a little water, so no need to make your own." &mdashMarc Murphy

Yield

Ingredients

  • 2 duck breasts (about 1 pound each)
  • 1/4 cup Armagnac or brandy
  • 1/4 cup dried cherries
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, divided
  • 3 shallots, minced
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 cup ruby port
  • 1 cup red wine
  • 2 cups chicken stock (homemade or store-bought)
  • 1 cup store-bought demi-glace
  • 2 cups raw, 1/2-inch-dice foie gras (optional)

Method

Preheat the oven to 350°F position the rack in the middle of the oven.

Score the skin of the duck breast, making sure you do not cut all the way through to the meat. Pat the duck dry with paper towels and let it come to room temperature while you prepare the glaze.

In a small bowl, combine the Armagnac and dried cherries and set aside to soak. In a medium pan, heat 1 tablespoon olive oil over medium heat until simmering. Add the shallots, season with a little salt and pepper, and cook, stirring, until soft, 2 to 3 minutes. Add the red port and wine and raise the heat to high. Cook until it has reduced by half, 5 to 6 minutes. Add the stock and cook until the liquid has reduced by half, 8 to 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, in a large skillet, heat the remaining 1 tablespoon oil over low heat. Season the duck with salt and pepper. Place it in the pan, skin-side-down, and cook until the fat has rendered out and the skin is deep brown and crispy, 8 to 10 minutes. Flip the duck over so it is skin-side-up and transfer the pan to the oven. Roast until medium&ndashrare, 8 to 10 minutes.

While the duck is baking, add the demi-glace to the pan with the reduced wine mixture and season with salt and pepper to taste. Stir in the soaked cherries and any Armagnac left in the bowl, reduce the heat to medium, and cook slowly until the sauce has thickened and the cherries are soft, 7 to 9 minutes. Stir in the foie gras, if using, and cook for 2 minutes. Remove from the heat.

Transfer the duck to a carving board and let rest for 10 minutes before carving.

Halve the breasts on an angle, and serve half a breast per plate with the reserved glaze.


LINGUINE WITH RED CLAM SAUCE

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Have I told you lately how much I love, love, love clams? I’m fairly certain I have cooked them just about any way possible. See links below to some of my favorite clam dishes. However, last evening, I forgot that I had yet to make Linguine with Red Clam Sauce. Of course, I had to take on a more non-traditional approach by adding hot Italian sausage from Johnsonville, like I do in my Clams with Sausage. Yes, you can leave out the sausage if you so desire. Just let me tell you, I will be making this recipe over and over again!

Let’s talk portions. I don’t know about you, but the more clams, the better. I would base this dish on ensuring that each person gets about 10 to 12 clams. That’s just me, but I think you can never have too many clams. Yes, you can use canned clams. However, I would prefer you not. So, if fresh clams are available in your area, use them. Local to Charlotte? Grab your littleneck or middleneck clams from The Carolina Meat & Fish Co.

CLEAN THE CLAMS

The first step to ensure that any clam dish, especially this Linguine with Red Clam Sauce, comes out perfectly is to clean and rinse your clams. There are so many methods out there. In my opinion, I prefer soaking mine in a mixture of cold water and flour. Be sure to discard any clams that are open prior to soaking. Soak for about 10 minutes prior to use. The clams will ingest the flour and spit it out along with any dirt or grit lurking inside its shell.

Rinse well. Unless you are pulling them out of the water yourself, there is probably no need to scrub them. A nice rinse will suffice. You can do this ahead of time. Just be sure to place the clams back into the fridge until you are ready to cook them.

HOW TOPREPARE THE LINGUINE WITH RED CLAM SAUCE

Start a big pot of water boiling for the pasta. You kind of want to time everything perfectly so that you can use part of the pasta water in your sauce. Heat the olive oil in a large pot. This enameled cast iron pot from Lodge was perfect for this dish. If you have read any of my other blogs, you know that anytime I have a recipe that calls for hot sausage, I always use the sausage in its casings. I just think it has more flavor than bulk once the casings are removed.

Remove sausage from casings. Break apart in pot and brown. Once the sausage is almost fully-cooked and browned, add in the minced garlic and shallots. Cook for about a minute or so. Do NOT brown. Drop pasta in boiling water. Be sure to generously salt the pasta water.

Sprinkle in the crushed red pepper. Deglaze with the white wine. With a wooden spoon, scrape any browned bits from the bottom. Reduce the liquid by half. Add in the clam juice. Reduce just a bit more. Pour in the marinara sauce. Use a favorite jarred marinara, or make your own. It’s totally up to you. For my convenience, and because it tastes amazing, I used a jarred marinara sauce from Delallo.

The pasta should be releasing its starch. Add a ladle or two of the pasta water to the pot of sauce. Keep in mind, you will be steaming the clams in this sauce, so you do not want the sauce too thick.

Bring the pot to a boil. Add in the rinsed clams. Place lid to allow the clams to steam open. Have a bowl ready to place clams as they open. I do this to ensure that the clams do not over cook and become rubbery. As soon as the clams open up, take them out and reserve in bowl.

TO FINISH AND SERVE THE LINGUINE WITH RED CLAM SAUCE

Once all clams have opened (be sure to discard any clams that do not open) and been removed from pot, give the sauce a little taste. I did not need to add salt. The water from the pasta was salty enough. Reduce heat. Stir in a few tablespoons of fresh chopped parsley. Toss in the pasta either directly from the pot, or strainer. If you had to strain your pasta, never rinse. Coat with the sauce. Add about half of the clams back to the pot.

Find a huge platter, or bowl. With tongs, remove the pasta and clams from the pot. Place the remaining reserved clams on top of pasta. Spoon any liquid remaining in pot on top of clams to heat up. Garnish with fresh chopped parsley and lemon wedges. Serve the Linguine with Red Clam Sauce immediately with crusty bread. ENJOY!

As an alternative, ditch the pasta and serve these clams as an appetizer!

Love clams as much as I do? Check out more of my amazing recipes using these beauties from the sea!

LET’S GET SOCIAL!

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Shore-to-Table Dining

T he New England clambake, which traditionally includes a prix-fixe menu of lobster, steamers, mussels, and corn on the cob, evokes images of breezy coastlines, screeching seagulls, and salty seawater. For me, a girl who grew up near the shores of the Chesapeake, it ranks right up there with baseball and peach pie as a summer must. Luckily, there are number of local options&mdasha few with scenic views&mdashmeaning you don&rsquot have to travel to New England or even be near a beach to get that fresh-from-the-sea taste. In many cases, these restaurants also cater, turning your backyard into an instant party.

Wednesday nights are &ldquoLobster Lunacy&rdquo at Conte&rsquos Fish Market (448 E Main St, Mount Kisco 914-666-6929 contesfish.com), the fourth generation fish market/restaurant where you get two one-pound Maine lobsters (steamed) along with steamers or mussels, corn on the cob, and coleslaw ($39). Because this is a working fish market, the turnover of product is consistently fresh, offering patrons seafood as close as they can get to right off the boat. The restaurant, which has the ambience of a homespun Cape Cod fish shack, now has a license for beer and wine but you can still bring your own for a $10 corkage fee.

Sitting under the colorful oars at Day Boat Cafe (1 Bridge St, Irvington 914-231-7854 dayboatcafe.com) already feels a bit Nantucket-ish. Add the summer clambake special&mdasha heaping platter of lobster (one pound), mussels, clams, chorizo, and corn on the cob ($38)­­&mdashand you&rsquoll want to walk by the river post-meal to keep you in
that &ldquoshore&rdquo state of mind. This is a summer special only so, after Labor Day, you&rsquore out of luck.

There&rsquos a lively vibe to Morgan&rsquos Fish House (22 Elm Pl, Rye 914-921-8190 morgansfishhouse.net), where the clambake blue-plate special proved so popular last summer, it&rsquos now a year-round staple. Expect a very traditional presentation&mdashin a bag&mdashconsisting of a steamed one-pound lobster, littleneck clams, mussels, corn-on-the-cob, roasted new potatoes, and andouille sausage, served with drawn butter ($32).

You&rsquoll need a lobster bib and nutcracker for the delight that is Legal Sea Foods&rsquo (5 Mamaroneck Ave, White Plains 914-390-9600 legalseafoods.com) lobster bake&mdasha substantial assortment of clam chowder, steamers, mussels, chorizo, and a one to one-and-a-quarter-pound lobster ($36.95). The fact that it is a New England-based chain lends an air of authenticity along with its nautical decor.

Who needs a paper-topped table in Boston when you can dine amidst the thatched umbrellas and gorgeous water views of The Pier Restaurant & Tiki Bar? (1 Playland Pkwy, Rye 914-967-1020 pierrestaurantandtikibar.com) The scenic vista, visible from almost every angle, reminds you why you chose to live in Westchester in the first place. Throw in the eatery&rsquos authentic New England clambake, which includes a one-and-a-half-pound lobster, sweet steamer clams, plump buttered corn, Red Bliss potatoes, succulent mussels, and creamy clam chowder ($32.95), served Monday through Thursday nights, and you&rsquore in seafood heaven. Of special note: Playland has a history of serving clambakes on the pier starting in the 1920s complete with men wearing skimmers (ask owner John Ambrose to show you a photo).

Underhill&rsquos Crossing (74 1/2 Pondfield Rd, Bronxville 914-337-1200 underhillscrossing.com) recreates the mood of a New England clambake every Tuesday night in the summer with individualized stainless steel pots brought tableside. Inside: a seafood feast of a one-pound lobster, littleneck clams, PEI mussels, jumbo shrimp, sea scallops, corn on the cob, calamari, and new potatoes ($28). The presentation is as fun as the food. Just make sure you go before Labor Day this is a seasonal special.

Clambakes at Home

W ant to experience a longer affair where the wine and beer flow a little more freely? Consider the following caterers:


Watch the video: A NEW ENGLAND CLAMBAKE (August 2022).