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One & Only Resorts’ Culinary Expert Series

One & Only Resorts’ Culinary Expert Series


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The One & Only collection of resorts is synonymous with a James Bond-level of luxury, exclusivity, and white-glove service. So it should come as no surprise that they have international culinary experts in their (temporary) employ.

Three of the resorts around the world — Maldives, Palmilla, and Cape Town — are hosting a series of culinary "schools" that invite guests to learn more about local flavors, participate in cooking classes, and take tours of local gardens and markets.

At the One & Only Reethi Rah in the Maldives, guests can learn the art of food presentation and take cooking courses in a range of cuisines (Maldivian, Chinese, Arabic, Japanese, Italian, Thai, and even French desserts). It starts with a tour of the chef’s on-site garden, where guests get to pick their ingredients before learning to cook a chosen dish in the chef’s kitchen; the day ends with a luxe lunch of all the homemade dishes and guests go home with a recipe card and a One & Only

apron.

In Mexico, the One & Only Palmilla boasts its own herb garden and outdoor kitchen, which are both used in daily and weekly guest culinary programs. But one of the best parts of their program is the Iron Chef-style cook-offs led by on-site and visiting chefs from around Mexico. Hotel guests can pick their own ingredients from the garden before learning to cook authentic Mexican dishes with them. Then, the meal is enjoyed with wine and tequila pairings. (Photo courtesy of One & Only Resorts)

Lastly, the One & Only Cape Town ups the ante on the classic local "sundowner" experience for hotel guests, with Wine and Dine Evenings. The hotel has an enormous three-level wine "loft," which houses more than 5,000 bottles of wine to choose from. The hotel’s head sommelier opens up a few bottles during each Wine and Dine Evening to pair with local celeb-chef Reuben Riffel’s five-course meal served to 30 of the hotel’s lucky guests.


Use a Food Processor to Chop Onions (and Quit Crying)

It's noon on Sunday and you're back from the grocery store, ready to start prepping that triple-batch of ragu bolognese for the crowd of people you've agreed to feed later in about six hours.

And then you look down at your prep list: 6 onions, finely chopped. "What kind of masochist takes pleasure in chopping that many onions?" you ask out loud.

It's okay, I feel the same way. I'm the first to admit that my knife skills—while not bad—are pretty damn slow. I'm definitely not winning any onion chopping challenges, but I might have won the designation of "Most Careful" or "Lacking in Pace, But a Nice Guy" in my senior class if Iɽ gone to some sort of culinary vocational school.

Recently, Rhoda Boone, commander of all things Epi Test Kitchen, showed me an easier way. After years working in professional restaurant kitchens and being asked to slavishly chop onions ad nauseam, Rhoda wondered whether those onions really needed to be chopped by hand. "Weɽ always prep carrots and celery in the food processor," recalls Rhoda, "So why not onions?"

As Rhoda and the Test Kitchen team found out, there's no reason you shouldn't be using the food processor to chop onions.

Raw onions up top and caramelized onions on the bottom.

Photo by Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Rhoda Boone

In a test comparing hand-chopped onions to onions prepared in a food processor, Rhoda found very little difference between those prepared by hand and the ones she sent through the machine. Like magic, what would take an average home cook 10 minutes to chop—and countless tears—happened in less than 30 seconds with the press of a button. While they look a bit rougher than their hand-chopped brethren, they'll perform exactly the same way.

There are a few caveats here.

First off, you do have less control over the fineness of the chop when using the food processor—so if you happen to be employed in a three Michelin-starred French restaurant kitchen, this method might not be for you. (Oh, you're a home cook? Great, read on.)

If the recipe you're tackling calls for half an onion, it's probably not worth it to break out the food processor and deal with cleaning it afterward. Finally, if you're looking for grated onions, the don't bother using the shredding disk—Rhoda complained that the disk turned onions into a raggedy, watery mess. (The one time the shredder disk makes sense is if you're making latkes—you can pass the potatoes through at the same time and will end up draining the excess liquid anyway.)

The only thing left to do is figure out how to spend all the extra time you'll save.


Use a Food Processor to Chop Onions (and Quit Crying)

It's noon on Sunday and you're back from the grocery store, ready to start prepping that triple-batch of ragu bolognese for the crowd of people you've agreed to feed later in about six hours.

And then you look down at your prep list: 6 onions, finely chopped. "What kind of masochist takes pleasure in chopping that many onions?" you ask out loud.

It's okay, I feel the same way. I'm the first to admit that my knife skills—while not bad—are pretty damn slow. I'm definitely not winning any onion chopping challenges, but I might have won the designation of "Most Careful" or "Lacking in Pace, But a Nice Guy" in my senior class if Iɽ gone to some sort of culinary vocational school.

Recently, Rhoda Boone, commander of all things Epi Test Kitchen, showed me an easier way. After years working in professional restaurant kitchens and being asked to slavishly chop onions ad nauseam, Rhoda wondered whether those onions really needed to be chopped by hand. "Weɽ always prep carrots and celery in the food processor," recalls Rhoda, "So why not onions?"

As Rhoda and the Test Kitchen team found out, there's no reason you shouldn't be using the food processor to chop onions.

Raw onions up top and caramelized onions on the bottom.

Photo by Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Rhoda Boone

In a test comparing hand-chopped onions to onions prepared in a food processor, Rhoda found very little difference between those prepared by hand and the ones she sent through the machine. Like magic, what would take an average home cook 10 minutes to chop—and countless tears—happened in less than 30 seconds with the press of a button. While they look a bit rougher than their hand-chopped brethren, they'll perform exactly the same way.

There are a few caveats here.

First off, you do have less control over the fineness of the chop when using the food processor—so if you happen to be employed in a three Michelin-starred French restaurant kitchen, this method might not be for you. (Oh, you're a home cook? Great, read on.)

If the recipe you're tackling calls for half an onion, it's probably not worth it to break out the food processor and deal with cleaning it afterward. Finally, if you're looking for grated onions, the don't bother using the shredding disk—Rhoda complained that the disk turned onions into a raggedy, watery mess. (The one time the shredder disk makes sense is if you're making latkes—you can pass the potatoes through at the same time and will end up draining the excess liquid anyway.)

The only thing left to do is figure out how to spend all the extra time you'll save.


Use a Food Processor to Chop Onions (and Quit Crying)

It's noon on Sunday and you're back from the grocery store, ready to start prepping that triple-batch of ragu bolognese for the crowd of people you've agreed to feed later in about six hours.

And then you look down at your prep list: 6 onions, finely chopped. "What kind of masochist takes pleasure in chopping that many onions?" you ask out loud.

It's okay, I feel the same way. I'm the first to admit that my knife skills—while not bad—are pretty damn slow. I'm definitely not winning any onion chopping challenges, but I might have won the designation of "Most Careful" or "Lacking in Pace, But a Nice Guy" in my senior class if Iɽ gone to some sort of culinary vocational school.

Recently, Rhoda Boone, commander of all things Epi Test Kitchen, showed me an easier way. After years working in professional restaurant kitchens and being asked to slavishly chop onions ad nauseam, Rhoda wondered whether those onions really needed to be chopped by hand. "Weɽ always prep carrots and celery in the food processor," recalls Rhoda, "So why not onions?"

As Rhoda and the Test Kitchen team found out, there's no reason you shouldn't be using the food processor to chop onions.

Raw onions up top and caramelized onions on the bottom.

Photo by Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Rhoda Boone

In a test comparing hand-chopped onions to onions prepared in a food processor, Rhoda found very little difference between those prepared by hand and the ones she sent through the machine. Like magic, what would take an average home cook 10 minutes to chop—and countless tears—happened in less than 30 seconds with the press of a button. While they look a bit rougher than their hand-chopped brethren, they'll perform exactly the same way.

There are a few caveats here.

First off, you do have less control over the fineness of the chop when using the food processor—so if you happen to be employed in a three Michelin-starred French restaurant kitchen, this method might not be for you. (Oh, you're a home cook? Great, read on.)

If the recipe you're tackling calls for half an onion, it's probably not worth it to break out the food processor and deal with cleaning it afterward. Finally, if you're looking for grated onions, the don't bother using the shredding disk—Rhoda complained that the disk turned onions into a raggedy, watery mess. (The one time the shredder disk makes sense is if you're making latkes—you can pass the potatoes through at the same time and will end up draining the excess liquid anyway.)

The only thing left to do is figure out how to spend all the extra time you'll save.


Use a Food Processor to Chop Onions (and Quit Crying)

It's noon on Sunday and you're back from the grocery store, ready to start prepping that triple-batch of ragu bolognese for the crowd of people you've agreed to feed later in about six hours.

And then you look down at your prep list: 6 onions, finely chopped. "What kind of masochist takes pleasure in chopping that many onions?" you ask out loud.

It's okay, I feel the same way. I'm the first to admit that my knife skills—while not bad—are pretty damn slow. I'm definitely not winning any onion chopping challenges, but I might have won the designation of "Most Careful" or "Lacking in Pace, But a Nice Guy" in my senior class if Iɽ gone to some sort of culinary vocational school.

Recently, Rhoda Boone, commander of all things Epi Test Kitchen, showed me an easier way. After years working in professional restaurant kitchens and being asked to slavishly chop onions ad nauseam, Rhoda wondered whether those onions really needed to be chopped by hand. "Weɽ always prep carrots and celery in the food processor," recalls Rhoda, "So why not onions?"

As Rhoda and the Test Kitchen team found out, there's no reason you shouldn't be using the food processor to chop onions.

Raw onions up top and caramelized onions on the bottom.

Photo by Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Rhoda Boone

In a test comparing hand-chopped onions to onions prepared in a food processor, Rhoda found very little difference between those prepared by hand and the ones she sent through the machine. Like magic, what would take an average home cook 10 minutes to chop—and countless tears—happened in less than 30 seconds with the press of a button. While they look a bit rougher than their hand-chopped brethren, they'll perform exactly the same way.

There are a few caveats here.

First off, you do have less control over the fineness of the chop when using the food processor—so if you happen to be employed in a three Michelin-starred French restaurant kitchen, this method might not be for you. (Oh, you're a home cook? Great, read on.)

If the recipe you're tackling calls for half an onion, it's probably not worth it to break out the food processor and deal with cleaning it afterward. Finally, if you're looking for grated onions, the don't bother using the shredding disk—Rhoda complained that the disk turned onions into a raggedy, watery mess. (The one time the shredder disk makes sense is if you're making latkes—you can pass the potatoes through at the same time and will end up draining the excess liquid anyway.)

The only thing left to do is figure out how to spend all the extra time you'll save.


Use a Food Processor to Chop Onions (and Quit Crying)

It's noon on Sunday and you're back from the grocery store, ready to start prepping that triple-batch of ragu bolognese for the crowd of people you've agreed to feed later in about six hours.

And then you look down at your prep list: 6 onions, finely chopped. "What kind of masochist takes pleasure in chopping that many onions?" you ask out loud.

It's okay, I feel the same way. I'm the first to admit that my knife skills—while not bad—are pretty damn slow. I'm definitely not winning any onion chopping challenges, but I might have won the designation of "Most Careful" or "Lacking in Pace, But a Nice Guy" in my senior class if Iɽ gone to some sort of culinary vocational school.

Recently, Rhoda Boone, commander of all things Epi Test Kitchen, showed me an easier way. After years working in professional restaurant kitchens and being asked to slavishly chop onions ad nauseam, Rhoda wondered whether those onions really needed to be chopped by hand. "Weɽ always prep carrots and celery in the food processor," recalls Rhoda, "So why not onions?"

As Rhoda and the Test Kitchen team found out, there's no reason you shouldn't be using the food processor to chop onions.

Raw onions up top and caramelized onions on the bottom.

Photo by Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Rhoda Boone

In a test comparing hand-chopped onions to onions prepared in a food processor, Rhoda found very little difference between those prepared by hand and the ones she sent through the machine. Like magic, what would take an average home cook 10 minutes to chop—and countless tears—happened in less than 30 seconds with the press of a button. While they look a bit rougher than their hand-chopped brethren, they'll perform exactly the same way.

There are a few caveats here.

First off, you do have less control over the fineness of the chop when using the food processor—so if you happen to be employed in a three Michelin-starred French restaurant kitchen, this method might not be for you. (Oh, you're a home cook? Great, read on.)

If the recipe you're tackling calls for half an onion, it's probably not worth it to break out the food processor and deal with cleaning it afterward. Finally, if you're looking for grated onions, the don't bother using the shredding disk—Rhoda complained that the disk turned onions into a raggedy, watery mess. (The one time the shredder disk makes sense is if you're making latkes—you can pass the potatoes through at the same time and will end up draining the excess liquid anyway.)

The only thing left to do is figure out how to spend all the extra time you'll save.


Use a Food Processor to Chop Onions (and Quit Crying)

It's noon on Sunday and you're back from the grocery store, ready to start prepping that triple-batch of ragu bolognese for the crowd of people you've agreed to feed later in about six hours.

And then you look down at your prep list: 6 onions, finely chopped. "What kind of masochist takes pleasure in chopping that many onions?" you ask out loud.

It's okay, I feel the same way. I'm the first to admit that my knife skills—while not bad—are pretty damn slow. I'm definitely not winning any onion chopping challenges, but I might have won the designation of "Most Careful" or "Lacking in Pace, But a Nice Guy" in my senior class if Iɽ gone to some sort of culinary vocational school.

Recently, Rhoda Boone, commander of all things Epi Test Kitchen, showed me an easier way. After years working in professional restaurant kitchens and being asked to slavishly chop onions ad nauseam, Rhoda wondered whether those onions really needed to be chopped by hand. "Weɽ always prep carrots and celery in the food processor," recalls Rhoda, "So why not onions?"

As Rhoda and the Test Kitchen team found out, there's no reason you shouldn't be using the food processor to chop onions.

Raw onions up top and caramelized onions on the bottom.

Photo by Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Rhoda Boone

In a test comparing hand-chopped onions to onions prepared in a food processor, Rhoda found very little difference between those prepared by hand and the ones she sent through the machine. Like magic, what would take an average home cook 10 minutes to chop—and countless tears—happened in less than 30 seconds with the press of a button. While they look a bit rougher than their hand-chopped brethren, they'll perform exactly the same way.

There are a few caveats here.

First off, you do have less control over the fineness of the chop when using the food processor—so if you happen to be employed in a three Michelin-starred French restaurant kitchen, this method might not be for you. (Oh, you're a home cook? Great, read on.)

If the recipe you're tackling calls for half an onion, it's probably not worth it to break out the food processor and deal with cleaning it afterward. Finally, if you're looking for grated onions, the don't bother using the shredding disk—Rhoda complained that the disk turned onions into a raggedy, watery mess. (The one time the shredder disk makes sense is if you're making latkes—you can pass the potatoes through at the same time and will end up draining the excess liquid anyway.)

The only thing left to do is figure out how to spend all the extra time you'll save.


Use a Food Processor to Chop Onions (and Quit Crying)

It's noon on Sunday and you're back from the grocery store, ready to start prepping that triple-batch of ragu bolognese for the crowd of people you've agreed to feed later in about six hours.

And then you look down at your prep list: 6 onions, finely chopped. "What kind of masochist takes pleasure in chopping that many onions?" you ask out loud.

It's okay, I feel the same way. I'm the first to admit that my knife skills—while not bad—are pretty damn slow. I'm definitely not winning any onion chopping challenges, but I might have won the designation of "Most Careful" or "Lacking in Pace, But a Nice Guy" in my senior class if Iɽ gone to some sort of culinary vocational school.

Recently, Rhoda Boone, commander of all things Epi Test Kitchen, showed me an easier way. After years working in professional restaurant kitchens and being asked to slavishly chop onions ad nauseam, Rhoda wondered whether those onions really needed to be chopped by hand. "Weɽ always prep carrots and celery in the food processor," recalls Rhoda, "So why not onions?"

As Rhoda and the Test Kitchen team found out, there's no reason you shouldn't be using the food processor to chop onions.

Raw onions up top and caramelized onions on the bottom.

Photo by Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Rhoda Boone

In a test comparing hand-chopped onions to onions prepared in a food processor, Rhoda found very little difference between those prepared by hand and the ones she sent through the machine. Like magic, what would take an average home cook 10 minutes to chop—and countless tears—happened in less than 30 seconds with the press of a button. While they look a bit rougher than their hand-chopped brethren, they'll perform exactly the same way.

There are a few caveats here.

First off, you do have less control over the fineness of the chop when using the food processor—so if you happen to be employed in a three Michelin-starred French restaurant kitchen, this method might not be for you. (Oh, you're a home cook? Great, read on.)

If the recipe you're tackling calls for half an onion, it's probably not worth it to break out the food processor and deal with cleaning it afterward. Finally, if you're looking for grated onions, the don't bother using the shredding disk—Rhoda complained that the disk turned onions into a raggedy, watery mess. (The one time the shredder disk makes sense is if you're making latkes—you can pass the potatoes through at the same time and will end up draining the excess liquid anyway.)

The only thing left to do is figure out how to spend all the extra time you'll save.


Use a Food Processor to Chop Onions (and Quit Crying)

It's noon on Sunday and you're back from the grocery store, ready to start prepping that triple-batch of ragu bolognese for the crowd of people you've agreed to feed later in about six hours.

And then you look down at your prep list: 6 onions, finely chopped. "What kind of masochist takes pleasure in chopping that many onions?" you ask out loud.

It's okay, I feel the same way. I'm the first to admit that my knife skills—while not bad—are pretty damn slow. I'm definitely not winning any onion chopping challenges, but I might have won the designation of "Most Careful" or "Lacking in Pace, But a Nice Guy" in my senior class if Iɽ gone to some sort of culinary vocational school.

Recently, Rhoda Boone, commander of all things Epi Test Kitchen, showed me an easier way. After years working in professional restaurant kitchens and being asked to slavishly chop onions ad nauseam, Rhoda wondered whether those onions really needed to be chopped by hand. "Weɽ always prep carrots and celery in the food processor," recalls Rhoda, "So why not onions?"

As Rhoda and the Test Kitchen team found out, there's no reason you shouldn't be using the food processor to chop onions.

Raw onions up top and caramelized onions on the bottom.

Photo by Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Rhoda Boone

In a test comparing hand-chopped onions to onions prepared in a food processor, Rhoda found very little difference between those prepared by hand and the ones she sent through the machine. Like magic, what would take an average home cook 10 minutes to chop—and countless tears—happened in less than 30 seconds with the press of a button. While they look a bit rougher than their hand-chopped brethren, they'll perform exactly the same way.

There are a few caveats here.

First off, you do have less control over the fineness of the chop when using the food processor—so if you happen to be employed in a three Michelin-starred French restaurant kitchen, this method might not be for you. (Oh, you're a home cook? Great, read on.)

If the recipe you're tackling calls for half an onion, it's probably not worth it to break out the food processor and deal with cleaning it afterward. Finally, if you're looking for grated onions, the don't bother using the shredding disk—Rhoda complained that the disk turned onions into a raggedy, watery mess. (The one time the shredder disk makes sense is if you're making latkes—you can pass the potatoes through at the same time and will end up draining the excess liquid anyway.)

The only thing left to do is figure out how to spend all the extra time you'll save.


Use a Food Processor to Chop Onions (and Quit Crying)

It's noon on Sunday and you're back from the grocery store, ready to start prepping that triple-batch of ragu bolognese for the crowd of people you've agreed to feed later in about six hours.

And then you look down at your prep list: 6 onions, finely chopped. "What kind of masochist takes pleasure in chopping that many onions?" you ask out loud.

It's okay, I feel the same way. I'm the first to admit that my knife skills—while not bad—are pretty damn slow. I'm definitely not winning any onion chopping challenges, but I might have won the designation of "Most Careful" or "Lacking in Pace, But a Nice Guy" in my senior class if Iɽ gone to some sort of culinary vocational school.

Recently, Rhoda Boone, commander of all things Epi Test Kitchen, showed me an easier way. After years working in professional restaurant kitchens and being asked to slavishly chop onions ad nauseam, Rhoda wondered whether those onions really needed to be chopped by hand. "Weɽ always prep carrots and celery in the food processor," recalls Rhoda, "So why not onions?"

As Rhoda and the Test Kitchen team found out, there's no reason you shouldn't be using the food processor to chop onions.

Raw onions up top and caramelized onions on the bottom.

Photo by Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Rhoda Boone

In a test comparing hand-chopped onions to onions prepared in a food processor, Rhoda found very little difference between those prepared by hand and the ones she sent through the machine. Like magic, what would take an average home cook 10 minutes to chop—and countless tears—happened in less than 30 seconds with the press of a button. While they look a bit rougher than their hand-chopped brethren, they'll perform exactly the same way.

There are a few caveats here.

First off, you do have less control over the fineness of the chop when using the food processor—so if you happen to be employed in a three Michelin-starred French restaurant kitchen, this method might not be for you. (Oh, you're a home cook? Great, read on.)

If the recipe you're tackling calls for half an onion, it's probably not worth it to break out the food processor and deal with cleaning it afterward. Finally, if you're looking for grated onions, the don't bother using the shredding disk—Rhoda complained that the disk turned onions into a raggedy, watery mess. (The one time the shredder disk makes sense is if you're making latkes—you can pass the potatoes through at the same time and will end up draining the excess liquid anyway.)

The only thing left to do is figure out how to spend all the extra time you'll save.


Use a Food Processor to Chop Onions (and Quit Crying)

It's noon on Sunday and you're back from the grocery store, ready to start prepping that triple-batch of ragu bolognese for the crowd of people you've agreed to feed later in about six hours.

And then you look down at your prep list: 6 onions, finely chopped. "What kind of masochist takes pleasure in chopping that many onions?" you ask out loud.

It's okay, I feel the same way. I'm the first to admit that my knife skills—while not bad—are pretty damn slow. I'm definitely not winning any onion chopping challenges, but I might have won the designation of "Most Careful" or "Lacking in Pace, But a Nice Guy" in my senior class if Iɽ gone to some sort of culinary vocational school.

Recently, Rhoda Boone, commander of all things Epi Test Kitchen, showed me an easier way. After years working in professional restaurant kitchens and being asked to slavishly chop onions ad nauseam, Rhoda wondered whether those onions really needed to be chopped by hand. "Weɽ always prep carrots and celery in the food processor," recalls Rhoda, "So why not onions?"

As Rhoda and the Test Kitchen team found out, there's no reason you shouldn't be using the food processor to chop onions.

Raw onions up top and caramelized onions on the bottom.

Photo by Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Rhoda Boone

In a test comparing hand-chopped onions to onions prepared in a food processor, Rhoda found very little difference between those prepared by hand and the ones she sent through the machine. Like magic, what would take an average home cook 10 minutes to chop—and countless tears—happened in less than 30 seconds with the press of a button. While they look a bit rougher than their hand-chopped brethren, they'll perform exactly the same way.

There are a few caveats here.

First off, you do have less control over the fineness of the chop when using the food processor—so if you happen to be employed in a three Michelin-starred French restaurant kitchen, this method might not be for you. (Oh, you're a home cook? Great, read on.)

If the recipe you're tackling calls for half an onion, it's probably not worth it to break out the food processor and deal with cleaning it afterward. Finally, if you're looking for grated onions, the don't bother using the shredding disk—Rhoda complained that the disk turned onions into a raggedy, watery mess. (The one time the shredder disk makes sense is if you're making latkes—you can pass the potatoes through at the same time and will end up draining the excess liquid anyway.)

The only thing left to do is figure out how to spend all the extra time you'll save.


Watch the video: Oneu0026Only Le Saint Géran - Hereu0026Now (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Donzel

    It is unclear

  2. Haslet

    bright idea

  3. Eteocles

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  4. Rangey

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  5. Ardwolf

    Many thanks! There is still a reason to have fun ... With your permission, I take it.

  6. Lewis

    I apologize, but I think you are wrong. I can prove it. Write to me in PM, we'll talk.



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